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8 Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge
The Brooklyn Bridge here opened in 1883. It was the world's longest suspension bridge, a good 50% longer than the previous record holder. It was designed by the German immigrant engineer John Roebling. Roebling, when he was first surveying the site, unfortunately injured his foot. He got a tetanus infection. He died of that a few weeks later, even before the construction could get started. But he did have time to pass on the project to his son Washington Roebling. Unfortunately, Washington Roebling also didn't have the best of luck. When he was working on the foundations, deep underwater here, and he came back to the surface and got decompression sickness. From then on he was confined to his apartment. But through the window of his apartment, he could spy on the bridge, and he decided to continue managing the project. But he couldn't have done it without the help of his wife Amy. She shuttled instructions and information between him in the apartment and the construction workers near the bridge site. Like any tall bridge, a lot of people come here to try and throw themselves off the top of it. But when Steve Brodie in 1886 washed up on shore here, more or less where I am now, he claimed that he didn't want to end his life. He did the whole thing for a bet. Well, if that was true, he was the first person to ever jump off the Brooklyn Bridge and survive it. But a lot of people, including some of his friends who he later fell out with, claimed that he just thrown a dummy from the top of the bridge and he entered the water from down below here. Well, whatever the case, he became the big star of the day. And it started a new popular expression, “To pull a Brodie,” which meant to take a big chance - especially a suicidal one. Just haven’t taken any Brodies myself today. It's bad enough here lying on this dirty beach.
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Pier 15

8 Pier 15

Pier 15

Peck Slip

Peck Slip

Peck Slip

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